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1st ed combat
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zarn wrote:
The initiative system I use on SWd6 is pretty simple - declaring actions goes from lowest PER to highest PER (roll to determine ties), while resolving actions goes from highest DEX to lowest DEX (or MEC, in the case of driving stuff or shooting with gunnery). I also usually avoid rolls for heroes vs minions - if there's 'generic' minions (a bunch of bounty hunters, a gaggle of troopers, what have you), they always lose initiative ties.

So if you've got Bib at 2D DEX and 4D PER, while Bob has 4D DEX and 2D PER, then Bob first declares (so that Bib can react to that), while Bob's action resolves first (unless Bib does something crazy, like popping a FP).

Or, a more involved example: There's also Bub, which is 3D DEX and 3D PER.

Declaration:
Bob declares first (2D PER)
Bub then declares (3D PER)
Bib then declares (4D PER)

Resolution:
Bob goes first (4D DEX)
Bub then goes (3D DEX)
Bib then goes (2D DEX)

So Bib's advantage is that he can react to what the others are doing - but his disadvantage is that he's pretty slow.

I like your system a lot. Frankly, 1E combat seems really alien to me, reading about it...
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Wajeb Deb Kaadeb
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, let's talk about the GM and running a game. Like the movies, this game is all about interesting characters and swashbuckling action. Like most RPGs, this game runs best with GM gifted at telling stories.

Now, you can use a combat grid, miniatures, maps, and things like that...if you want to. The rules certainly allow for it. But, this game really hums with a GM describing all the action for the mind's eye of each player. You don't need maps. You can use them, but you don't need them. The game plays extremely well without them.

Each combat round is about five seconds of time. The GM describes what the players see as combat breaks out. The players each declare what they want to do. The GM then narrates how events play out, pausing to have players roll dice when needed. The GM then continues, incorporating the results of the dice rolls in his narration.

A player can do anything he wants to do within that five seconds of time. A player can say, "I fire at the first stormtrooper to my right, then move to cover behind the crate, peek around and fire two more shots at the closest trooper." It can be done in five seconds, and this game allows for all that in one combat round.

When the GM hears what the player wants to do, he breaks the actions down into game terms.



Typical Combat Round Actions

Use a Skill

Walk

Run

Change Stance




What does the player above want to do? He wants to fire his blaster (use a skill), move to the crate (Walk or Run), kneel down behind it (change stance), and fire two more shots (two more skill uses).

In this game, every action you take after the first means that your die code is reduced by -1D. If Roark (the character in the OP) fires his blaster once, then he rolls 5D+1. If he fires twice, he rolls 4D+1 for each attack throw.

The Roark Garnet character is not skilled enough to pull off everything this player wants to do. You cannot penalize a task to lower than 1D. The player wants to take three shots with his blaster, in total, plus move. Kneeling is considered part of movement, so it doesn't count as an action. Walking counts as an action. Running counts as two actions. At the minimum, Roark is -3D to his blaster shots (and the movement is not possible because Roark's DEX is only 3D+1.). The player will have to amend his actions to a blaster shot, the move and kneel, and the single final blaster shot (instead of two shots at the end). He can do all of that, taking a total of 3 actions in the five second turn and suffering -2D to any dice rolls.

Still, the player may not get to complete all actions in a round because another character may prevent him from doing so. Those stormtroopers can fire back at him!

The GM, when describing the action, will jump the focus of his description after each action. This is not unlike quick cuts in an action film (like, uh, Star Wars!). The GM will describe the first actions of all characters in the combat round, including the NPCs, then, he will describe the second actions, then the third actions, if any, and so on.



Quote:
A Simple Example of a Combat Round

Roark Garnet, Smuggler and opportunist with no love of the Empire, walks into a landing bay and sees a single stormtrooper there. The soldier in white turns, and his mechanical voice emits, "Hey, you there! Halt! This is a restricted pad." His blaster rifle is held at the ready, pointing at Roark.

Player: "Do I see any cover?"

GM: "Yeah, there's a crate about four meters to your right. The trooper is to your left. You would have to kneel behind it for cover."

Player: "Ok, I'm going to fire at the trooper, move to the crate, kneel, then fire two more shots....wait! No, I can't do all of that. I'll just fire one shot from the crate."

GM: "That's three actions, so you're -2D on any rolls."

Player: "Go it."

GM: "You see the trooper raising his blaster rifle. He's firing also. Whoever rolls the highest with his shot gets his shot off first."

Player: Roark's Blaster skill is 5D+2, now reduced to 3D+2. He rolls.

GM: (Doesn't tell player that the stormtrooper's Blaster skill is 3D, and he's only taking one shot) He rolls and beats the player's roll.

GM: As soon as the trooper says his sentence, you flinch and begin to raise your blaster, but the trooper is quicker. He fires his blaster and hits you before you can squeeze off a shot. Damage is 5D vs. Roark's Strength 3D.

GM: Roark takes the bolt in the right shoulder. He spins around, his blaster flying out of his hand, and flies to the ground. His vest is on fire for a moment from the heat of the bolt, but that goes out. Now, smoke and blinding pain throb out of your shoulder. The character is wounded.




Here, you see the best laid plans of men and mice. The player declared three action but didn't get to execute any of them. The stormtrooper was too quick for Roak. He shot and hit before Roark could act.

Note that the game doesn't bother with initiative rolls. No, the GM simple goes around the table in the most dramatic and logical fashion describing each character's first action as if the players were watching an space action movie. It doesn't really matter who goes first until a point at which one character affects the actions of another. At that point, just let the task rolls dice. The higher task roll means that action takes place first.

In the case of the above, the stormtrooper fired before Roark could act. The trooper's attack roll was higher. Thus, Roark's blaster attack never happened. The stormtrooper fired, and Roark went down.

But, there's another type of action I haven't mentioned yet. It's called a Reaction. Some skills are Reaction Skills and can only be used when triggered. When they are triggered, they reduce skill use (from that point forward) just like any other skill.

Dodge is a reaction skill. It is used to get out of the way of incoming blaster fire. The target number, based on Range, for the stormtrooper to hit Roark was 10. The trooper, with his 3D skill, rolled 10 exactly, which indicates that Roark is hit and wounded. Blasters are powerful in this game. Roark wasn't killed (but could have been), but he sure was knocked down and hurt bad when he took the hit.

When the trooper fired, Roark could then declare a reaction skill use. Reaction skills can be declared immediately when they are triggered. In this case, Roark's Dodge is 4D+1. But, remember that Roark was -2D to all skill uses. Thus, the player could roll 2D+1 vs. the trooper's attack throw of 10. If successful, Roark dodges out of the way of the trooper's incoming fire. If he fails, he's hit (so Roark has nothing to lose).

The player throws 2D+1 and gets an 11.

This means the trooper misses.

GM: "The bolt jets over your right shoulder. It was so close that you could feel the heat from the thing as it barely missed you."

But now, the player has just used another skill. He is now -3D to all tasks, and he cannot change the tasks he declared. He can either do them or not. This makes movement impossible as the character doesn't have enough dice to move. Thus, Roark is -3D on his first action--his blaster shot at the trooper (that he can now re-roll because of the successful Dodge).

Roark's turn would end right there because he can't move with a -3D penalty (he's got 3D+1 DEX). So, the player will know that his character can perform a maximum of three actions and still be able to move. To be safe, in future combat rounds, he may only want to declare one or two actions. That way, he's got room for a Reaction skill and can still perform the rest of this declared actions.



NOTES

Think tactically about how many actions you declare.

Other characters, or reaction skills, may preempt you from carrying out all declared actions in a combat round.

Each action you take after the first lowers any dice code by -1D.

Running lowers die codes by -1D.

Dropping stance is counted as part of movement, but standing up or rising from a kneel is counted as an action.

Whenever rolling against movement, roll the Dexterity code (Stromtrooper Blaster vs. Character DEX to decide if blaster fire happens before or after movement).

Pulling a holstered weapon (drawing) can be done in the same action as the attack, but apply -1D to the code.
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Lord Zash
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

got a doubt with combat. Been searching in the forums and couldn't find anything similar, hopefully you guys will be able to help Very Happy

How do you guys handle round 2, 3 etc... of decent character players vs. clumsy stormtroopers? At short distance... after round 1, at least one stormtrooper is going to end up on the floor stunned or worse.
How do you roleplay that? I run a couple of examples and all the stormtroopers were stunned (so they couldn't do anything on the rest of that combat round but they could act in subsequent rounds).
In the films once they are hit... they usually go flying and you don't really see them anymore causing problems agains the heroes.

So, even if they are stunned you carry on playing with them or just for a captain or someone a bit more important?


Also, the rules say once a character falls prone is a +5 difficulty to hit that. If a stormtrooper is stunned and falls prone... shouldn't it be easier to hit it and leave it dead once and for all? xDDD (dude on the floor struggling to get up).

Bit of a Bible there, sorry!
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Wajeb Deb Kaadeb
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

STUN!



Let's talk a little bit about stuns. The rule says that, on a successful hit, a character is, at a minimum, stunned. In other editions and rule upgrades, you'll find different ways Stuns are measured in the game. But 1E Star Wars, by the book, sticks by the notion that a blaster packs a hell of a wallop and will flat out knock you on your butt.

What is a blaster bolt? It is a gas that has been super-heated to a plasma state. That's one of the reasons the bolts are relatively slow for a weapon (You can't see bullets fired from a slug thrower moving as slow as blaster bolts.) These plasma bolts carry a hell of a lot of kinetic energy, though. When a bolt hits, it slams into its target, usually doing a lot of physical damage. Remember the scenes in any of the Star Wars movies, especially in The Force Awakens. When people are hit, wearing armor or not, the energy from the blaster bolt sends the target flying.



In game terms, a stun occurs when the character's defensive STR roll is higher than the Damage roll. If a character is stunned, the game says that the stunned character falls prone and cannot do any action for the rest of the game round.

Note that a combat round in 1E is about five seconds long. So, if a character is effected by a stun, then he is only robbed of his actions for five seconds or less. It could be 1 second, or even 3 seconds.

If a character has already acted in a combat round, then the stun, really, has no real effect except to knock the character down. Consider a character taking two actions and acting early in the round, on combat segment one and segment two. Then, on segment three, the character is stunned by a foe. The stunned character is not allowed to act for the rest of the round due to the stun, but the character doesn't have any actions left to perform anyway!

In 1E, it is typical to have two or three action segments in a combat round as characters rarely perform more than two or three actions. Of course, if a Force Point is spent, you can see a lot more combat segments in a round, but that happens rarely. Plus, experienced characters will "save" an action for a Reaction, like a Dodge.



MAKE THE STUN VISUAL AND EXCITING!

When a stun is applied to a character, PC or NPC, make it extremely exciting with your description. You need to breathe the life of STAR WARS SWASHBUCKLING ACTION into the minds of your players.

Don't always describe the same thing with something like, "Oh, you're stunned. You're knocked down. No more actions this round."

Instead, you want to describe how the blaster bolt zoomed by and grazed the character's shoulder, igniting the character's tunic on fire! The character spins--almost a three-sixty--and is slammed to the ground!

Quote:
You can actually smell your flesh burning! And your arm! By instinct you pat out the fire, but you thought or a second that your arm had been torn from its socket!


THAT'S how to describe a stun.



I also want to point your attention at all the excellent notes given to Game Mastes in the 1E rulebook. Don't ignore these. There's tons of great advice in that book.

You can use the idea of Interpreting Rolls (page 30) when you gauge how to play out your stuns. If the STR roll beat the Damage roll by a great deal, then maybe the stun isn't so bad.

Remember when Leia got hit in Return of the Jedi? By the rules, she was stunned. Yet, she didn't go sprawling across the wooded plain, right? No, what happened was that she got grazed, said, "Ouch," and she squatted down--because it hurt!

In game terms, this is a light graze. Leia STR roll beat the Damage roll by A LOT.

What are the mechanics of the game with a stun? A character gets knocked down and is allowed no more actions for the round.

Did Leia take any more actions that round? No.

Did Leia get knocked down? Yes. She was already squatting, firing her blaster, when she got hit. She fell backward on her feet, and Han reached down to help her.



But, I am hear to say that you don't even really need to knock a character off their feet, or describe them as even getting grazed or hit, when a stun occurs, as long as the mechanics of the game are satisfied.

Picture a character leaning around the corner of a corridor wall, and the character gets hit--resulting in a stun.

Why not do something a little different with the stun? Say that the bolt smashed into the wall close to the character's head. Bits of polymer explodes from the hit. "Oh!" Screams the character, as she involuntarily ducks back around the corner and sinks to her knees.

The character is "shell shocked" from the blast going off so near her head. Survival instinct kicks in. That's why she crouches, almost in the fetal position. Maybe she's can't see because of wall debris in her eyes.

Are the mechanical effects solved? Yes. She doesn't act the rest of the round. And, to stand back up, it's an action, just like standing up after being knocked down.

Mechanically, the two scenarios are the same.

You can even describe the stunned character as not crouching and not being knocked down, if you want. Just keep the mechanics the same. The stunned character in that situation would not do any actions for the rest of the round and be penalized -1D the next round (the same penalty if an action was used to stand up).

Does a character drop what he's holding when he is stunned? That's up to the GM and his dramatic description. I'd use the difference between the STR and Damage roll as a guide. If the STR and Damage rolls are close together, then the stun is a hard one. Be aggressive with your description. The stunned character is not only knocked down, but he tosses anything in his hands, and he skids a few feet when he hits the ground.

On the other hand, if the STR roll soundly beats the Damage roll, then describe the damage as a spray of plasma--the bolt struck something solid close to the character and plasma shrapnel sprayed on the character. It's hot, but she maintains balance--she's just paused for a moment. (And, if she's not knocked down, then be sure to penalize the character by -1D for stun residue to keep the mechanics the same.)
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Wajeb Deb Kaadeb
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Zash wrote:
So, even if they are stunned you carry on playing with them or just for a captain or someone a bit more important?


I keep playing all stunned enemies.



Quote:
Also, the rules say once a character falls prone is a +5 difficulty to hit that. If a stormtrooper is stunned and falls prone... shouldn't it be easier to hit it and leave it dead once and for all? xDDD (dude on the floor struggling to get up).


The idea of the penalty is because there's less of a target. With someone standing up, there's lots of target surface. With someone lying prone, the target is just a fraction of what it used to be.

If a foe was standing next to a prone target, I wouldn't use the penalty. Pointing down and firing at a target next to your feet.
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Lord Zash
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brilliant,

thanks man! Great tips there. Really appreciated.


How do you tend to end the encounters with just average foes that all end stunned? If they're all stunned, players get to them and tie them up with a rope or something? Or players can say ''move and you're dead'' type of thing?

I'd be tempted of ending a combat if the enemies are wounded (unless they're really special) rather than keep on playing. It's because say 3 stormtroopers ended up incapacitated after an encounter with 2 of my players with superior skills. To kill the stormtroopers my players have to actually get close to them and shoot them in the face. Is not that a bit dark for 1st trilogy? Very Happy
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Wajeb Deb Kaadeb
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Zash wrote:
How do you tend to end the encounters with just average foes that all end stunned? If they're all stunned, players get to them and tie them up with a rope or something? Or players can say ''move and you're dead'' type of thing?


The stun only lasts for that round. Not the next round. So, either keep playing combat, but start the stunned characters in their last, stunned position....

Example: Ral Jerrick is attacked by a stormtrooper from behind. Action segment one, the trooper's shot is higher than Ral's, so the trooper fires first. It misses because Ral Dodges.

Ral does a 180, pulls his heavy blaster, and fires. Ral hits the trooper, but only stuns him.

In describing the stun, the GM says that the trooper dodges to the left and smashes into the wall. This would seem like a use of the Dodge skill, but really it's only the GM colorfully describing the trooper not getting damaged (he was hit, but not damaged--only stunned).

The trooper slides down the wall.





What happens to the naked eye?

Ral walks down a hallway, when a blaster bolt flys past him, nearly taking his shoulder off.

Ral's instincts take over, he spins on his boot toes to left, drawing his big, heavy blaster as he spins.

And, right when he's spun to see the trooper behind him, he fires!

The trooper jumps to right side of the corridor, slams into the wall. He keeps his grip on his blaster rifle and slides to the ground.





What happens mechanically?


The encounter begins at Medium Range. The trooper declares that he'll fire at Ral, and Ral declares that he'll fire at the trooper. But, Ral has to change facing to shoot behind him (the spin) and draw his weapon. Ral also says that he will Dodge incoming fire.

So, for initiative, trooper rolls his Blaster Dice. And Rall rolls his Blaster Dice too, at -3D (-1D to draw, and -1D spin/change facing, -1D for Dodge).

The trooper's roll is higher, and it is good enough to hit Ral at Medium range, but it's not good enough to hit Ral when he is Dodging.

Ral's shot it good enough to hit the trooper at Medium Range, even with the -3D penalty.

Ral throws damage, and it's enough to Stun the trooper.

But, the trooper has already completed his actions for the round. So, losing the rest of his actions is moot. But, we still have to satisfy the penalty of ending the round prone, so the GM describes the trooper's quick leap and smash into the wall in order to avoid the blaster bolt.





ROUND TWO

Now, we're at round two. We pick up exactly where we left off last round. Ral's starting position for this round is that he's is not facing the direction from where he came, blaster out and pointing that same way.

The trooper starts this round prone, crashed up against the wall on the right, blaster rifle in his hands.

The GM asks, "What do you want to do?" And, he waits for the declarations that phase.





Quote:
I'd be tempted of ending a combat if the enemies are wounded (unless they're really special) rather than keep on playing. It's because say 3 stormtroopers ended up incapacitated after an encounter with 2 of my players with superior skills. To kill the stormtroopers my players have to actually get close to them and shoot them in the face. Is not that a bit dark for 1st trilogy? Very Happy


Incapacitate means the character is either unconscious or cannot effectively operate in combat because of a wound. Maybe he's sitting there, awake, looking at his leg twisted the wrong way, broken at the knee.

Remember page 28: The book gives you the core rules, but it's up to you to make the game entertaining. Curb the rules a bit, as I suggested above with Stun, to get the same effect mechanically but describe the situation in very cool Star Wars terms.

Stuns are basically grazes and hiccups in combat. Something happens that makes the character pause for a moment.

As I purposefully showed in the example above, a Stun only keeps a target from doing actions if the stunned character hasn't acted yet. If the stun happens after the target acts, as did the stormtrooper in the example, then the trooper loses no actions.

A stun can be a near miss that keeps the target from responding quickly--causing a hiccup. As when a blaster blows out part of the wall, and a character ducks back around a crate to protect himself from the shrapnel.

A stun can also be a graze attack. Maybe it blows off the shoulder guard on the trooper's armor.




Wounds are actual light wounds. A heavy graze. Or think of it as a heavy stun. Something happens that has a stun effect at first, and then requires the character to be a -1D to all rolls. Maybe he sprained his ankle getting out of the way of the blast. Maybe the blast did send him flying, and he's got a burn that he's got to take are of (like Leia in Return of the Jedi). Or, maybe he can't use his left hand, but is still functional at -1D to all actions.




Incapacitate is what you are thinking of from the movies. The troopers go flying, and they're either dead, unconscious, or otherwise unable to function in combat.
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Wajeb Deb Kaadeb
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

WOUNDED creativity.

You can also get creative with Wounded characters, sometimes.

Consider a typical Stormtrooper.

STR 2D (3D for armor defense)

Brawling 3D

DEX 1D (-1D due to armor restriction)

Blaster 3D (-1D armor reduction)

Brawling Parry 3D (-1D armor reduction)

Dodge 3D (-1D armor reduction)


All other attributes: 2D




What happens when this character suffers from a Wound? He's -1D. Which means his raw DEX of 1D is DEX 0D.

He can't move!

This is a situation where he can prop himself up and fire from a seated position.

Or, he can regain some movement by shedding his armor, and thus getting rid of the -1D armor penalty. He'll have an effective DEX 1D with a Wound.
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Lord Zash
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Wajeb!
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Wajeb Deb Kaadeb
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Zash wrote:
Thanks Wajeb!


Sure, man. If you've got any more questions, post them here. We love to help.

And, if so inclined, post your recaps of your game sessions! We love reading those!
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Lord Zash
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quick question:

when a character falls prone, do you still apply the dodge amount they obtained if they have been fired upon in this segment?

Example:


3 players vs 1 bounty hunter.
3 players declare 1 shot each against the hunter. The bad guy feels confident and declares 2 shots against PCs (penalty of -1D).


1 of my PCs that has high Dex gets lucky and goes first (I work with initiative, I know it's not proper 1st edition, sorry). The bounty hunter rolls an 8 on his dodge (penalty of -1D), still with the dodge gets hit as they all using rifles and are within 30m (18 to hit).

We resolve damage... the Bounty hunter just gets stunned but as this is first edition, falls prone and can't do anything for the rest of the round.


The other 2 players still declared shots against the bad guy... do you apply the 8 to dodge + 5 of prone (so those other shots would be 23 to hit)? Or do you ignore that?
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good question, Zash. The rules don't specifically address that example, but on p.13 in the Initiative section, it says, "Normally it doesn't matter when during an action segment a particular character gets to act. Everyone just moves, or shoots, or uses some other skill. The only time it matters is when someone uses a skill that will affect another's skill use." Dodge is "skill use," and stunned result states the character "can't do anything for the rest of the round". So even though the Dodge roll was already rolled for that segment, I would rule that the bounty hunter not being able to "do anything" would make his Dodge roll no longer applicable his attackers, so they would just have the +5 to their difficulty for the target now being prone.

But I'm not sure what that means to you since you have tweaked the ruleset by adding Initiative to a game without Initiative.
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Lord Zash
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Whill,

thanks for replying!! That's exactly how I thought I would do but asked first here to see how other people do it. Cheers!


As for the initiative, I really tried to wrap my head around the initiative system when there are several opponents having an influence on each others actions etc. I couldn't, even with all the examples provided in this forum. Probably over thinking it? My players thought it was really weird (they come from other systems) so I thought... right let's make it a normal initiative system.

It was so bad it was putting all of us off playing this game... So I thought... screw this, I want to play SW 1st edition (I can't deal with the volume of rules 2nd and expanded have)... we all want it... so let's do our own thing!
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Zash wrote:
when a character falls prone, do you still apply the dodge amount they obtained if they have been fired upon in this segment?
Yes.
Quote:
Example:

3 players vs 1 bounty hunter.
3 players declare 1 shot each against the hunter. The bad guy feels confident and declares 2 shots against PCs (penalty of -1D).

1 of my PCs that has high Dex gets lucky and goes first (I work with initiative, I know it's not proper 1st edition, sorry). The bounty hunter rolls an 8 on his dodge (penalty of -1D), still with the dodge gets hit as they all using rifles and are within 30m (18 to hit).

We resolve damage... the Bounty hunter just gets stunned but as this is first edition, falls prone and can't do anything for the rest of the round.


The other 2 players still declared shots against the bad guy... do you apply the 8 to dodge + 5 of prone (so those other shots would be 23 to hit)? Or do you ignore that?
Your added initiative system doesn't change that.
PH p14 wrote:
If you dodge and more than one opponent fires at you in the same action segment, your dodge roll affects all opponents attacks.
Even though you instituted a priority to each individual action in a segment you didn't include additional rules that change what those actions do. One dodge applies to the entire segment no matter how many people shoot at you - or in what order they shoot at you. Unless you re-write dodging.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Zash wrote:
Quick question:

when a character falls prone, do you still apply the dodge amount they obtained if they have been fired upon in this segment?


This is just me, other people here know the rulebooks to the letter, but as a DM, I'd rule that since the first shot stunned the bounty hunter either the next two shots automatically missed (the character is falling from the effect of stun, second and third blaster shots miss him) or - if the skill check is high enough - the subsequent shot(s) hit for full damage. Its a good question but hard to rule without it happening in front of me.
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