STAR WARS D6 DAMAGE

This document updates and expands some of the game rules in The Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Second Edition, Revised and Expanded published by West End Games (hereinafter R&E), which is required to use the rules in this document. Please also note that, unless specifically referring to ships with interstellar hyperdrives or R&E rules, the more general terms spaceship or ship are used here in place of starship to be correctly inclusive of spaceships without interstellar capabilities. To ask questions, provide feedback, make suggestions, or otherwise discuss these house rules, please visit the Rancor Pit Forums thread for these rules.  

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General (this page)

Characters and Creatures

Spaceships and other Vehicles

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General

Cover and Protection

Note: This replaces the Cover and Protection rules on R&E p.93-94.
 

Cover

Characters are harder to hit when they’ve got cover: something that hides them from attackers. In some situations, such as smoke or fog, these modifiers may also be added to search or Perception difficulties to spot a hidden character. When spotted, add any applicable cover modifiers to the difficulty to hit the target.

 Cover  Modifier
 Light smoke     +1D
 Thick smoke     +2D
 Very thick smoke     +3D
 Poor light     +1D
 Moonlit night     +2D
 Complete darkness     +4D

Characters can also position themselves behind objects — such as walls and speeders — which provide cover and protection (see “Protection” below). Add the cover modifier below to the attack difficulty based on how much of the target character is covered.

 Target is:  Modifier
 Fully covered   If cover provides protection, attacker cannot hit target directly; attacker must reduce the cover
 ¾ covered  +3D
 ½ covered  +2D
 ¼ covered  +1D
 Not covered  No cover modifier

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Protection

Note: This system is a generalization that is mostly applicable to walls, doors, and other mundane obstructions. Do not use the protection damage rules if the protection is something that has more specific damage rules, such as a vehicle.

Sturdy objects may provide protection. If the attacker rolled well enough to beat the basic difficulty, but not well enough to beat the added cover modifier, that means that the shot hit whatever the character was hiding behind. Roll the attack’s damage against the protection’s body strength.

 Sample Protection  Body Strength
 Flimsy wooden door           1D
 Better wooden door           2D
 Standard metal door           3D
 Reinforced door           4D
 Blast door           6D

If the damage roll is lower than the body strength roll, the protection is not significantly damaged at all and the target character suffers no damage. If the damage roll is equal to or greater than the protection’s body strength roll, find the difference in the ranges on the chart below to see how badly the protection is damaged. After the chart are the explanation for each damage level and damage accumulation rules. A character behind protection may suffer some damage depending upon how badly his protection is damaged. Subtract dice from the attack’s damage based on the chart below. (See the “Damage" section of  “Characters and Creatures” linked at the top and bottom of this page).

 Damage Roll > Body Strength Roll by:  Protection is:  Weapon damage reduction
                               0-3  Slightly damaged  Character is completely protected
                               4-7  Lightly damaged  -3D
                               8-11  Heavily damaged  -2D
                             12-15  Severely damaged  -1D
                              16+  Destroyed  Character suffers full damage

Slightly damaged protection has some superficial or other minor damage that does not affect its cover or protection.

Lightly damaged protection that is lightly damaged again become heavily damaged.

Heavily damaged protection that is lightly damaged or heavily damaged again become severely damaged.

After an attack results in protection being severely damaged and the target damage roll is made, the protection’s cover is moved down one step. If cover is reduced to none (Not covered), it also provides no further protection. Severely damaged protection that is lightly damaged, heavily damaged, or severely damaged again is destroyed.

Destroyed protection provides no further cover or protection.

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Object Damage

Note: These damaged object rules were extrapolated from damaged weapons rules, as suggested by the note on R&E p.95. See the “Weapon Damage and Repair” section below.

Do not use this section for damage to armor, weapons, droids, vehicles, or spaceships — those have more specific damage systems further down this page or linked at the top and bottom of this page. This is a general damage system for ordinary objects and items not covered by other damage rules, such as security systems, jump packs, or non-vehicular computers and shields technology. The GM will determine specific lightly and heavily damaged effects for each item.

There are two main types of damage that effect objects: normal damage and ion damage. Ion weapons are designed to interfere with with a machine's electrical and computer systems. The damage chart below includes both types of damage. If an ion blast hits a character carrying an electronic object (and it was not the object specifically being targeted), the GM may determine that the object suffers ion damage against the same damage roll (see the “Character/Creature Damage/Injuries” section of “Characters and Creatures”).

When an object takes damage, pick the object’s body strength and compare the roll to the damage roll. If the body strength roll is higher than the damage roll, then there's no significant effect. If the damage roll is equal to or greater than the item’s body strength roll, find the difference on the chart below to see how badly the object is damaged. After the chart are the explanation for each damage level and damage accumulation rules.

 Damage > Body Strength by:  Ion Damage Status  Normal Damage Status
                       0-3  No effect  Slightly damaged only
                       4-7  Ionized -1D  Lightly damaged
                       8-11  Ionized -2D  Heavily damaged
                     12-15  Ionized -3D  Severely damaged
                       16+  Ionized -4D  Destroyed

For objects with electrical components, each ionized result temporarily penalizes the object for the remainder of the round it occurs and the following round. The number of penalty dice are indicated by the specific result, and the results are cumulative at any given time. Ionized objects have a penalty equal to the penalty die code. If the character does not have any dice to roll related to the object, blue electricity plays all over the weapon and the object may not be used at all while it lasts. Objects without electrical components are not effected by the ionized result.

Slightly damaged objects have some superficial or other damage that does not affect their primary use or function.

Lightly damaged objects suffer -1D/-3 penalties or have congruent detriments as applicable. Lightly damaged objects that are lightly damaged again become heavily damaged.

Heavily damaged objects suffer -2D/-7 penalties or have congruent detriments as applicable. Heavily damaged objects that are lightly damaged or heavily damaged again become severely damaged.

Severely damaged objects cannot be used but may be repaired. Severely damaged objects that are lightly damaged, heavily damaged, or severely damaged again are destroyed.

Destroyed objects are irreparable.

See the next section below for general repair rules.

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Repairs and Damage Control

Note: This replaces the R&E p.59 portion of “Using Repair Skills” and includes a new repair option (Damage Control).

Some general rules regarding repair skill checks are outlined here for easy reference. Most repairs are made with Technical skills, and the GM will determine which skill is to be used for each repair. Repairs to various technologies follow similar patterns for time taken and skill difficulties. All repair times, difficulties, and costs assume the availability of the proper tools and parts, but these are generalizations. The GM is free to adjust them to suit the needs of the game.

Several skill rolls can be made when properly repairing damaged ships, vehicles, and equipment. The difficulty level and time taken for the initial skill roll varies, based on the level of damage. Should that roll fail, additional repair rolls with the same difficulty may be made after sequentially increasing lengths of additional time, starting at 15 minutes. High technology machinery is very complex and requires extra maintenance to ensure it operates at optimum performance levels. While repair rolls can represent time taken to maintain vehicles and vessels, this type of activity can be done “off-camera” (outside of game play) rather than take place during adventures.

Each damaged system aboard a vehicle or vessel (drives, shields, weapons, etc.) requires a separate repair roll to fix. No single repair roll will fix all the systems of any craft if multiple components are damaged. However, several characters using repair skills may dole out the work and try to fix different systems at the same time — that just requires separate rolls.

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General Repairs

Do not use this section for repairing weapons, armor, droids, vehicles, or spaceships — those have more specific repair rules further down this page or linked at the top and bottom of this page. This is a general repair system for items not covered by other repair rules, such as cybernetics, security systems, jump packs, or non-vehicular computers and shields technology. The GM will determine repair costs.

 Technology is:  Repair Time Taken  Repair Difficulty
 Slightly damaged only  varies  Very Easy
 Lightly damaged  15 minutes  Easy
 Heavily damaged  One hour  Moderate
 Severely damaged  Four hours  Difficult
 Destroyed  n/a  n/a

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Damage Control

Damage control is the process of improperly repairing damaged or malfunctioning items, droids, armor, weapons, or vehicle/spaceship systems with fast and risky jury-rigs. Damage control has no effect on destroyed technologies, and it cannot be done for nearly obliterated droids. The Repair rules for “Spaceships and other Vehicles” (linked at the top and bottom of this page) indicate some system damages that damage control does not apply to. The GM may determine that damage control is not applicable to slightly damaged results or other situations.

The difficulty of the damage control skill roll is the same as for normal repairs, but the outcome is different, and the time taken is much less. Once the character is in place to effect damage control, the time taken is based on the proper repair’s difficulty as indicated by the chart below.

 Damage Control Difficulty  Time Taken
 Easy or Very Easy  1 round
 Moderate  2 rounds
 Difficult  3 rounds
 Very Difficult  4 rounds

The character effecting the jury-rig can do nothing else except perhaps limited free actions at GM discretion, such as speaking. An interrupted jury-rig automatically fails. These quick repairs cannot be rushed further. At the end of the time frame, the character’s player rolls the skill against the difficulty. Failure means that the jury-rig cannot be attempted for that technology again until it is damaged again.

Success means that the item, droid, armor, weapon, or vehicle/ship system improves functionality by one step at the beginning of the next round. Droids, armor, and non-vehicular weapons function on the next lesser damage level. Vehicle/ship systems function as one step better, such as 1D or 1 lost speed level. Disabled vehicular weapons are restored to the function equivalent of one heavy damage and one light damage. Vehicles and ships may only have one jury-rig in place per system but jury-rigs for multiple systems can be in effect simultaneously — each one requires its own time taken and skill roll.

The jury-rigged technology is still considered to have the actual damage level for damage accumulation and proper repair purposes. If a jury-rigged item, droid, armor, weapon, or vehicle/ship system gets damaged again, the jury-rig instantly fails and the technology is further damaged as if it hadn’t been repaired at all. If a vehicle or ship suffers severe damage, all jury-rigs currently in place instantly fail, even if the newly damaged system was not one that had been jury-rigged. However, characters may attempt to effect new jury-rigs for damaged systems.

Every time the jury-rigged item, droid, armor, weapon, or vehicle/ship system is used and the roll has a 1 on the wild die, the GM rolls 1D and consults the following chart for the result:

 Roll   Wild Die 1 Result
    6  Jury-rig sparks, sputters, and smokes, but holds
    5  Jury-rig fails but a bang on the tech restores it
  4-2  Jury-rig fails
    1  Jury-rig explodes, true damage worsens one level

This makes damage control particularly risky for severely damaged technologies, because every time they are used, there is a chance they may be destroyed.

A jury-rig may be undone at any time by the character who put it in place through a non-roll action, allowing the technology to function at its true damage level (if still functional) without the risk of additional damage merely from use. Another character with access to it may attempt to undo the jury-rig by taking 1 full round and the player making the skill roll at one difficulty level lower than the original difficulty. If this roll has a 1 on the wild die, then the jury-rig explodes at the start of the next round, whether the roll was successful or not. If the character was successful, then this explosion only causes 3D damage to the character and the technology returns to the functionality of its true damage. If the skill roll was unsuccessful, then this explosion worsens the true damage by one level (which undoes the jury-rig). A safe option to not use the technology or system at all is for a character to just deactivate it as a non-roll action or through whatever skill roll the GM deems appropriate (but this may not always be an option).

Jury-rigged technologies cannot be in use while properly repairing them. Proper repairs include removing any jury-rigs safely.

Jury-rigged repairs done for the purpose of dishonestly passing a damaged or malfunctioning technology off as being in a better state of repair than it truly is when selling it is sometimes referred to as “jawa-rigging.”

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Non-Vehicular Weapon Damage and Repair

Note: This replaces the rules for damaging weapons on R&E p.95. This also replaces the rules for repairing weapons on R&E p.60, but this only applies to non-vehicular weapons. And this updates the Time Taken information on p.59 and 62. For vehicular weapon systems, see the updated damage/repair rules for “Spaceships and other Vehicles” linked at the top and bottom of this page.

Non-vehicular weapons can suffer damage, such as when a lightsaber slices through a blaster or vibroweapon, or as a result of a “complication” that leads to a malfunction. There are two main types of damage that effect weapons: normal damage and ion damage. Ion weapons are designed to interfere with with a machine's electrical and computer systems. The damage chart below includes both types of damage. If an ion blast hits a character carrying an electronic weapon (and it was not the weapon specifically being targeted), the GM may determine that the weapon suffers ion damage against the same damage roll (see the “Character/Creature Damage/Injuries” section of “Characters and Creatures”).

If a non-vehicular weapon is damaged, roll its body strength to resist damage. Most hand weapons — such as blaster pistols, vibro-axes and so forth — have a body strength of 2D (regardless of how much damage they cause). After determining the weapon’s body strength, compare the roll to the damage roll. If the body strength roll is higher than the damage roll, then there's no effect. If the damage roll is equal to or greater than the item’s body strength roll, find the difference on the chart below to see how badly the weapon is damaged. This chart also includes repair details. The repair costs reflect the price of replacement parts based on the weapon’s original value. After the chart are the explanations for each damage level and damage accumulation rules.

 Damage > Body Strength by:  Ion Damage Status  Normal Damage Status  Repair Time Taken  Repair Difficulty  Repair Cost
                        0-3  No effect  Slightly damaged only  varies  Very Easy  varies
                        4-7  Ionized -1D  Lightly damaged  15 minutes  Easy  15%
                        8-11  Ionized -2D  Heavily damaged  One hour  Moderate  25%
                      12-15  Ionized -3D  Severely damaged  Four hours  Very Difficult  35%
                        16+  Ionized -4D  Destroyed  n/a  n/a  n/a

For weapons with electrical components, each ionized result temporarily penalizes the weapon for the remainder of the round it occurs and the following round. The number of penalty dice are indicated by the specific result, and the results are cumulative at any given time. Ionized weapons have an attack penalty equal to the penalty die code. If the character does not have any dice to roll, blue electricity plays all over the weapon and the weapon may not be used at all while it lasts. Weapons without electrical components are not effected by the ionized result.

Slightly damaged weapons have some superficial or other damage that does not affect their use or function.

Lightly damaged weapons suffer a penalty of -1D for attack and damage rolls. Lightly damaged weapons that are lightly damaged again become heavily damaged.

Heavily damaged weapons suffer a penalty of -2D for attack and damage rolls. Heavily damaged weapons that are lightly damaged or heavily damaged again become severely damaged.

Severely damaged weapons cannot be used but may be repaired. Severely damaged weapons that are lightly damaged, heavily damaged, or severely damaged again are destroyed.

Destroyed weapons are irreparable.

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Armor and Powersuits, Damage and Repair

Note: This replaces the damage rules for armor on R&E p.94-95. This also replaces the repair rules for armor on R&E p.60 (note under Weapons repair), but this also applies to powersuits. And this updates the Time Taken information on p.59 and 62.

Armor protects the wearer from damage, and powersuits enhance other character abilities (as indicated by suit stats). Power armor is both. In game terms, armor adds a bonus to a character’s Damage Resistance (Strength roll when resisting damage — See the “Damage" section of  “Characters and Creatures”). Armor may provide different levels of bonus protection for different attack types, such as physical attacks (bullets, mundane melee weapons, rocks, etc.) and energy attacks (blaster bolts, lightsabers, ion weapons, etc.). Some types of armor also reduce a character’s Dexterity and all Dexterity skills.

When someone wearing armor suffers damage through a protected area (as determined by the GM), the armor is also damaged. The chart below indicates the character injuries that can damage armor/powersuits. On the chart, the injury suffered by the armor/suit wearer is each attack’s damage result, not the wearer’s accumulated wound status from multiple wounds. The chart also includes repair details. The repair costs reflect the price of replacement parts based on the armor/suit’s original value. After the chart are the explanations for each damage level and damage accumulation rules.

 Injury suffered by armor/suit wearer   Damage to armor/suit   Effect on armor  Repair Time Taken   Repair Difficulty   Repair Cost 
 Wounded  Lightly damaged  -1 pip damage resistance   15 minutes  Moderate         15%
 Incapacitated  Heavily damaged  -1D damage resistance  One hour  Difficult         25%
 Mortally wounded  Severely damaged  Useless until repaired  Four hours  Very Difficult         35%
 Killed  Destroyed  Irreparable  n/a  n/a         n/a

Lightly damaged armor has a -1 penalty to its damage resistance bonus (for both physical and energy damage). Lightly damaged powersuits suffer -1D/-3 penalties to other characteristics or have congruent detriments as applicable. Lightly damaged armor/suits that are lightly damaged again becomes heavily damaged.

Heavily damaged armor has a -1D penalty to its damage resistance bonus (for both physical and energy damage). Heavily damaged powersuits suffer -2D/-7 penalties to other characteristics or have congruent detriments as applicable. Heavily damaged armor/suits that are lightly damaged or heavily damaged again become severely damaged.

Severely damaged armor/powersuits provide no benefits but may be repaired. Severely damaged armor/suits that are lightly damaged, heavily damaged, or severely damaged again are destroyed.

Destroyed armor/powersuits are irreparable.

Ion damage has no effect on an armor's ability to protect characters, but ion blasts that hit characters may effect the electronic components of armor such as helmet sensors. If an ion blast hits a character (and it was not the armor specifically being targeted), the GM may determine that the electronic components of the piece of armor hit suffers ion damage against the same damage roll (see the “Character/Creature Damage/Injuries” section of “Characters and Creatures”).

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Ion Weapons vs. Powersuits

If a character wearing a powersuit is hit with an ion weapon, the damage is rolled against the powersuit instead of the character. The powersuit's body strength for this roll is 2D plus the effective damage resistance bonus against energy weapons (considering current damage). Consult the chart below.

 Damage > Body Strength by:  Ion Damage Status
                       0-3  No effect
                       4-7  Ionized -1D
                       8-11  Ionized -2D
                     12-15  Ionized -3D
                       16+  Ionized -4D

Each ionized result temporarily penalizes the powersuit for the remainder of the round it occurs and the following round. The number of penalty dice are indicated by the specific result, and the results are cumulative at any given time. Ionized powersuits cause the wearer to suffer a penalty to any action that requirement body movement equal to the penalty die code. If the penalty die code amount exceeds the character's effective Dexterity (considering current wound status), then blue electricity plays all over the powersuit and the character may not move at all while it lasts.

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Blasters Underwater

Note: The following rule is based on a rule on p.8 of the first edition adventure module Battle for the Golden Sun.

When energy weapons not specifically designed for underwater use (of any scale) are fired underwater, the attacker suffers a -7 penalty to hit and -2D to damage. Visibility and other factors may warrant additional penalties. See the “Damage" section of  “Characters and Creatures.”

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Game Option: Skill Damage Bonus

Note: The following rule is based on Optional Combat Rules on p.58 of Rules of Engagement: The Rebel SpecForce Handbook.

When a successful attack is rolled: for every 4 points over the to-hit difficulty number, add +1 to the damage roll. This does make the game more deadly, so the GM may rule that this damage roll bonus does not apply to the attacks made by unimportant characters. See the “Damage" section of  “Characters and Creatures.”

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Characters and Creatures

Spaceships and other Vehicles

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To ask questions, provide feedback, make suggestions, or otherwise discuss these house rules, please visit the Rancor Pit Forums thread for these rules